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« The insurgent wants a banana | Main | Max's Journal »

Thursday, 12 January 2006

Comments

Anamaria

Thank you, Amanda! These tips are enormously helpful; now I'm ready to dive right in! I did have some questions about seam allowances on the pattern (from that Nuigurumi Style book that's making the rounds right now...) I'd like to try first.

N.b. I'm the same way about patterns! Although I did just cut up a Native American costume (I think costume patterns are exempt from the usual rules of cutting and sewing!). Thanks for the tip on the interfacing, too!

Blair

Thanks for all these tips Amanda. I love feeling like I have insight into how a pro makes softies, I seem to be softie-impaired at the moment for whatever reason. Maybe this will help me get over my fear of plunging in, my kids are asking for some, apparently I've left too many Japanese craft books laying around that they've flipped through.

abbyjane

What a good idea to put all these tips down in one place. There really is a steep learning curve when you make softies a lot. For me learning to use the short stitch length (I also use "2" on my sewing machine) was really an important one. The only other one I would add would be to turn small appendages (like little legs and ears, etc.) inside out before turning the body inside out. This way you don't have to fish around with tweezers and pull really hard to get these little parts turned which risks tearing the fabric. Hope that makes sense!

myra

Great tips! I especially like the one about using lightweight interfacing for your patterns. I sometimes use freezer paper to trace my patterns for small pieces. I iron the traced pattern (uncut) to the fabric and sew through the freezer paper and the fabric, remove the paper and then cut my seam allowances around the sewed lines. Also, if I'm sewing with a frayable fabric I use fray check on the edges before I turn to help keep the seams from popping open.

Any tips for turning small fabric tubes like for drawstrings or handles? This always drives me crazy.

manda mcgrory

Fantastic tips! Thank you!

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